Jump to content
Shiloh Discussion Group

Recommended Posts

A member of West Point Class of 1859, I joined Strawbridge's First Louisiana Infantry in 1861 and fought at Shiloh, where I was wounded. Later on the staff of Joseph Wheeler, I got caught while carrying despatches and was imprisoned at Johnson's Island in Lake Erie... but not for long. I made my escape by using a homemade ladder and stealing a skiff, and found safety in Canada, where I made my way to Montreal and renewed acquaintance with another Shiloh veteran, Jacob Thompson. Thompson was part of the Canadian Cabinet, conducting operations on behalf of the South, from the Great White North; and I volunteered to take part in one of his more notorious operations...

Who am I?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A hint:  If you were informed of the location of this Agent of the Confederate Government's action, you would find his identity in 30 seconds at wikipedia. As it happened, he may have encouraged one prominent individual to join the circus...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For whatever reason, the Battle of Shiloh spawned Confederate veterans that gravitated towards “special operations,” with George Dixon and CSS Hunley, George P. Canning and CSS Shenandoah, and Jacob Thompson and the Canadian Cabinet... and this original member of Strawbridge's Louisiana and his special assignment.

It would be difficult to find another battle that produced so many similar-minded individuals.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The attached article, "Famous Trials: the Summation of the Honorable John Bingham," contains the name of the subject of this quiz question (and also contains names of other Shiloh veterans who were caught up in Confederate clandestine operations, either as operatives or intended victims.)

https://famous-trials.com/lincoln/2174-binghamclose  by Professor Douglas O. Linder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Done, Rbn3!

In November 1864, following reelection of Abraham Lincoln as President, a pre-planned operation to burn down New York City commenced in the evening of November 25th: nearly two dozen fires initiated through use of the chemical, Greek fire, were set in hotels and other businesses across the city. Unfortunately for the eight Confederate operatives, the Greek fire required air as well as fuel and doors to rooms were closed instead of blocked open... and the fire in almost every case burned out before causing serious damage. The one verified success was at P. T. Barnum's American Museum, which was gutted. [Barnum took his show on the road after the Civil War and became involved in one of America's most successful circuses.] But success at Barnum's Museum cost Confederate clandestine operative Kennedy his life.

The Attack on New York was just one of many operations during the Civil War that involved irregular warfare: the North had the Great Locomotive Race and Dahlgren's Raid; the South attempted Prison breakouts (Camp Douglas and Elmira) and Johnson's Island (which involved the use of commandeered Great Lake vessels) the Raid at St. Albans, the use of virus-infected clothing to spread disease...

The Civil War possessed a lot more facets than most folks realize [see link for more.]

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/intelligence-history/civil-war/Intel_in_the_CW1.pdf  Clandestine Operations during the Civil War.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...