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Sean Chick

Where was Hindman Wounded

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The story of Hindman's wounding on April 6 is among the most dramatic incidents of a battle full of them. What I am wondering is where he was wounded. Most books place it at Review Field, before Stewart and Shaver attacked. However, the official reports of Bragg and Shaver case some doubt in my mind. Bragg says it occurred during Stewart's 11:30 a.m. attack at Duncan Field. Shaver also says as much.

 

Thoughts anyone?

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The conventional wisdom: "in vicinity of Review Field, sometime after 10:30 a.m. Day One." The following is from SDG post of 31 January 2017, contributor Ron, titled "22nd Tennessee."  [Sometime after 10:30 am, a further split apart of Russell's Brigade occurred when the 12th Tennessee, under Lt. Col. Bell moved to the east and attacked McAllister's Union Battery in the northwest corner of the Review Field (Part C).  This attack was led by Brig. Gen. A.P. Stewart and was composed of the mentioned 12th Tennessee and Stewart's 4th Tennessee, both supported by Stanford's Mississippi Battery.  Brig. Gen. Hindman was severely wounded in this attack when his horse was hit by a shell from McAllister's Battery.  The general got on his feet, shouted to the troops and collapsed and was removed from the field.  The attack continued across the 800 feet of the Review Field and came under a heavy fire of the union battery and the 45th Illinois.  The Tennessee troops got to 30 paces away from the union battery, halted and fired a heavy volley and then rushed forward and drove off the union defenders.  Capt. McAllister was able to remove 3 of his guns but left 1 gun abandoned on the field...]

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But, I do not trust conventional wisdom...

Thomas Hindman (1828 - 1868)

With slight experience gained during the Mexican War, the brave war-advocate Thomas Hindman was in U.S. Congress when the Secession Crisis erupted. He quit Congress, and raised the 2nd Arkansas Volunteers during May 1861 (mustered into service 1 June 1861). Briefly commanding “Hindman's Legion” in NE Arkansas, and exercising his wits in order to arm his force, Hindman was in Kentucky by October 1861 under command of General Albert Sidney Johnston. Based at Bowling Green, and immediately under MGen William Hardee, Hindman gained experience via a number of skirmishes; then covered the rear of the column during General Johnston's withdrawal south from Kentucky through Nashville. It appears Hindman was promoted to BGen in September 1861 and given charge of a brigade.

Although recorded in the Shiloh Confederate OOB as commander of the First Brigade of Hardee's Third Corps, it is known that during Day One at Shiloh General Hindman was put in charge of a Division [numerous references, “The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston” page 572 and D.W. Reed's “Battle of Shiloh and the Organizations Engaged” page 67.] It appears this ad hoc division came about by combining Wood's Brigade with Hindman's Brigade (and possibly Stewart's Brigade, acquired from Polk.) There was an attempt, possibly orchestrated by General Albert Sidney Johnston with the forces under Thomas Hindman, to construct a “swinging gate,” to force Federal soldiers in the front of Hindman's Division north (and with the pivot of the gate of Stephen's Brigade counter-clockwise) to herd those Federal soldiers northwest, away from the Landing and the Federal gunboats. However, when General Johnston was informed (incorrectly) that there was “another Federal Division, east of Prentiss” General Johnston extended his line to the east and confronted Stuart's Brigade of three infantry regiments and no artillery... and the opportunity to use Hindman's Division and its swinging gate was lost.

On review of available records, because Thomas Hindman was moved significantly, from one side of the battlefield almost to the other, it appears brigade commanders lost track of him, and estimated times of his wounding (and where it occurred.) The 10:30 a.m. report is the earliest, and the least likely. Other commanders indicate Hindman was wounded “by a cannonball or shell striking his horse” near Duncan Field, in the early afternoon [Hardee OR 10 p.569 “early afternoon; Stewart p.428 seems to indicate early afternoon; Shaver p.574 seems to indicate Hindman was wounded about the same time LtCol Dean fell; LtCol Bell p.423 seems to put the time “Hindman led a charge against a battery” as 1 o'clock, or just before. Braxton Bragg p.466 seems to indicate General Hindman was moving towards the Hornet's Nest, and seems to indicate early afternoon.]

A discussion of Hindman's Division was initiated by Billy 1977 as part of SDG topic “Bushrod Johnson's Brigade, morning of 6 April” post of 27 AUG 2016 and commences discussion of the use of Hindman; and post of 29 AUG 2016 by Ozzy indicates involvement of Hindman's Division.

Based on the available reports, my determination: Brigadier General Hindman was brought down by the impact of an artillery round striking his horse in the early afternoon of 6 April 1862, likely in vicinity (near southern, or western edge) of Duncan Field.

Ozzy 

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Thanks for the response Ozzy, and the use of the term "ad hoc." I find that word useful for the Confederates at Shiloh.

My estimation, after reading Stewart's report yesterday, is that Hindman was wounded around 11:30-12:00p.m. before Stewart attacked across Duncan Field. I think his wounding is one reason the attack did not mature so to speak. He was pushing his men hard in the morning. Add to that low ammunition, exhaustion, and heavy losses from previous fights, and any shot Stewart had was gone.

What evidence is there for Johnston wanting Hindman to hinge with his division?

 

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ASJ and Hindman's pivot

http://npshistory.com/publications/civil_war_series/22/sec6.htm tenth paragraph down, which begins: “At this point in the battle, Albert Sidney Johnston...”

Ozzy post of 28 AUG 2016 (see references to passages in Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston) in Billy 1977 topic, “Bushrod Johnson's Brigade morning of 6 April.”

 

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Had another look at OR 10 page 578 (Report of Major James Martin, 7th Arkansas) and a close read indicates the 7th Arkansas was involved with the effort against a battery on Review Field (encouraged by General Hindman) then moved directly to the southerly edge or western edge of Duncan Field. No further comment is made of BGen Hindman, which indicates the 7th Arkansas was unaware what became of him. But if Hindman was wounded "about the same time that LtCol Dean fell," then the incident most likely took place in vicinity of Duncan Field.

My educated guess...

Ozzy

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