Jump to content
Shiloh Discussion Group
Ron

HELP!

Recommended Posts

As my field sergeant said, "I want some volunteers?  You, you, you and you will do". 

 I have resumed writing on my Shiloh Book and I would like to use place names such as rivers, creeks, woods, farms, hills, ravines as accurate to those of 1862 as possible.  I am a nut for authenticity to place my narration as close to 1862 conditions as possible. An example, I refer to what is called the Hamburg-Savannah road today as the River road which, I believe to be the name it had in 1862.  Is this correct??  I also believe both the Tilghman and the Locust Grove ravines had different names in 1862.  Am I correct?? What was the Shiloh Hill??  Was this a reference to the entire battle area which was higher than the neighboring creeks and the river??  Were there any other local place names that have not passed down through time??  Another example is the sunken road, known to all of us.  But, before the battle, it was referred to as a stage road used by stage coaches which was no longer in service before the battle.  I believe this is accurate or is it??

I'm trying to be accurate and do justice to the local civilians and still need info on those who lived on the battlefield.  I have picked up much help already with your posts on our discussion board but find some posts confusing.  These families seem to know each other. 

HELP, all of you local citizens and board members, step forward, do your duty, sign up and receive your enlistment bonus of 20 hardy handshakes and pats on the back (combined total of twenty, not twenty each, lets not get greedy here).  Your veterans pension for those who have served here is 20 inchs of bottomland in the Hindman bottomland, along the drainage canal.  I bet you didn't think I knew about this choice property.

P S  Also the names of the residents on the battlefield current to the battle. 

Thanks

Ron

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The subject of the sunken road being an old stage road has already been challenged. I checked my source, Shiloh The Battle That Changed the Civil War by Larry Daniel, on page 203, second paragraph and his note #3 on page 360.  Several references are provided but I notice that with the single exception of one Louisiana soldier, all references are from northern soldiers. 

Therefore, I must conclude that since no southern soldier or any local resident supports the thought of this road being an old stage road, it was nothing more than an old farm road.  What is certain is that it was an uneven depth of several inches to three feet in sections.  The road ran in an southeast direction from the area of the Duncan farm buildings and the Main Corinth road to the Hamburg-Savannah road, also referred to as the River road, above the Sarah Bell Peach orchard.  This stage road theory appears to be part of the entire myth of the sunken road fighting sponsored by northern soldiers.  The union soldiers who fought there and survived were rewarded by being part of the single greatest surrender of US soldiers until World War Two.  Both Cunningham and Sword referred to the road as a wagon trail, Cunningham on page 240 and Sword on page 241.  

Even so, respects to all who fought there and I am glad I was not one of them.

Ron  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron, the first reference to the hamburg-savannah road being the river road (as far as I can find) is in the reports of the union army. the sunken road was a field road that lead from the corinth road to the fields in the river bottom. there was one school building on the park at the time of the battle, just northwest of the intersection of the hamburg-savannah road and the corinth road. this was the same building that had housed the union church but the church had failed in the late50's. the shiloh church was there but the school that was just east of the church had burned in 1854 and school was being held in the church building. armstrong had a store at the landing and was partners with pitts tucker in the tavern that was at the landing. armstrong and tucker are listed as the landowners. north of the present day headquarters were the hagy's, just west of them were the hurley's as John mentioned in the iicinity of the tree that blew over with the cannonball in it.in the area of the main entrance, south south east corner, was the Tilghman,s. . this could run long I will try to sketch a map of farms for you. I knew I would screw up going from memory Pettigrew was the man that was in with pitts tucker and owned the store, armstrong was the boot and shoe maker that lived just north north east of the intersection of the H to S road and the corinth road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CD Do you think that the "Sunken Road" was also a lane to not only the bottom feilds but also to the upper landing??Because today one can walk along an old rd to that area and if wanted continue on and come out accross from the cabin/peach orchard.

Mona

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mona: If you can find some old maps from around the turn of the century, you might see Brown's ferry shown at about where the upper landing was. There was a road down to the ferry, but I can't say if there was a road there at the time of the battle. If I remember correctly (and that's suspect), at one time you could see the signs of an old road near the river running south from the indian mounds area. I suspect that this old road went to the upper landing, or was a road down to the ferry.

Grandpa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in there there is an old road bed that courses from the Southern most mound and down the hill into that bottom-at that point its so low no raod bed is seen but if you keep walking south you'll come upon a really good roadgoing back up to an old house/barn place that i was told last inhabited by a Luke Holland back inthe 50's or early60's then you just keep following the old raod back to accross from bloody pond.I'll see if I can find an old map.

Mona

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Makes me want to walk more.In october when the cool air is once more out I think I will come down and walk more of the placies that I have over look.I let you know when so if some of you are up for it we can get together.the snakes and bugs by then wouldn't be as bad.  

aaron yates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the actual landing was on the south side of lick creek where it ran into the river. during the time of the battle there was a road that ran beside the southern most indian mound and on into the bottom. when the park made the orginal purchase the boundary ranwest from the river at the foot of the finger that the indian mounds sat on, it ran west up a ravine within approx. 300 ft of the savannah hamburg road and then turned due south to johnston's ravine then turned east for a short distance then turned due south past the ohio zouave monument. when the park purchased this land the other road was cut into the bottom from the holland house place. jimmy rogers purchased this property in the early 70's and larry deberry rented it until the park purchased it in the late 70's. the main road from Brown's ferry was on the south side of lick creek and joined the savannah hamburg road approx 150 ft east of lick creek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×