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WI16thJim

Gov. Harvey

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Today I received a link to Google Book's Leander Stillwell's "The Story of A Common Soldier":

http://books.google.com/books?id=6QwTAAAAYAAJ&ots=-hB0hZBFlK&dq=Leander%20Stillwell%20Shiloh&pg=PA1#v=onepage&q=Leander%20Stillwell%20Shiloh&f=false

On pages 67-68 Stillwell tells of Gov. Harvey Of WI drowning at the landing.  When I was at Cherry Mansion in Savannah last April, I mentioned that I had read that the Gov. had visited the troups at Shiloh and then had gone to Savannah to visit those in the hospitals.  He was then transfering from one boat to another at the Mansion when the accident occured.  I was asked if I would find this source.  Of course, I haven't been able to find it and had let it slide lately, until I read this in Stillwells book.  Does anyone know for sure where Gov. Harvey drown?

Jim

(Sheeesh, I wonder if I'm starting to get cabin fever!) 

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Jim,

The follwing comes from Wisconsin in the War of the Rebellion p. 436:

"On Saturday morning, April 19th, Governor Harvey bade farewell to the soldiers at Pittsburg Landing, and went down to Savannah, ten miles below, on the Tennessee River. It was not expected to take a steamer for Cairo until the next morning, and some of the company had retired for the night, on board the Dunleith, lying at the wharf. But at ten o'clock in the evening the Mineehaha hove in sight, the party were aroused, and Governor Harvey, with others, took position near the edge and fore part of the Dunleith awaiting the opportunity to pass the approaching boat. As the bow of teh Minehaha rounded close to the party on the Dunleith, the Governor stepped back on one side, either for convienience or to get beyond harm, and the night being dark and rainy, and the timber of the boat slippery, by some mis-step, he fell between the two steamers. Dr. Wilson, of Sharon, being near, immediatley reached down his cane, which the Governor grasped with so much force as to pull it from his hands. Dr. Clark of Racine jumped into the water, made himself fast to the Minehaha and thrust his body inthe direction of the Governor, who, he thinks, once almost reached him, but the current was too strong; the drowning man, it is supposed, was drawn under a flat boat just below, and when his life was despaired of, Dr. Wolcott and General Brodhead, of Milwaukee, and others of the party, made dilligent and long search to recover the body of the lost one, but in vain, until some children found it sixty-five miles below. Citizens there buried the remains, which were disinterred, brought to Madison, laid in state in the Assembly Chamber, and buried in Forest Hill Cemetery, near the Capital, Reverend M.P. Kinney, of Janesville, conducting the religious services."

Tom

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Thanks Tom.  As an interesting side note.  I'm from Sharon, WI, the town Dr. Wilson was from.  It's a little cow town on the WI - IL border.  When I tell the residents about the part their town played in the Civil War, you can almost hear the yawns.  I just can't figure some peoples lack of interest! :)

Jim

 

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From Madison.com: http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/odd-wisconsin-death-of-state-s-young-governor-added-to/article_d52544d6-8897-11e1-b64f-0019bb2963f4.html

Odd Wisconsin: Death of state's young governor added to pall during Civil War period

One hundred fifty years ago Wisconsin lost its popular young governor, Louis Harvey. His unexpected death threw a pall over an already dark time during the Civil War.

Less than two weeks before Harvey's death, Wisconsin troops were the first to discover the Confederate surprise attack at Shiloh, Tenn. On April 6-7, 1862, more American soldiers were killed or wounded than in all our previous wars combined.

Gen. Ulysses Grant wrote that the battlefield was "so covered with dead that it would have been possible to walk across the clearing, in any direction, stepping on dead bodies, without a foot touching the ground."

Most Wisconsin participants were fresh recruits who had never seen combat. More than 600 died or were wounded. News soon reached Madison that hundreds of injured young men from our state lay without care in makeshift tents or on hospital ships across the region.

On April 10, Gov. Harvey rushed south with a team of Wisconsin doctors and 90 crates of medical supplies. He visited soldiers in hospitals, on shipboard, in private homes and in camp. The governor was a celebrity, and as the physicians treated soldiers' injuries, his presence raised their spirits. By April 19 he had distributed all the supplies and turned homeward.

But at 11 that night, while stepping from one steamboat to another in the rain, Harvey slipped and fell into the river. The night was dark and the current strong. His body was recovered 65 miles downstream. He had been governor for just 103 days.

Jim

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sounds like he was a real popular man and loved by all Wisconsin, almost within grasp then 65 miles thats something wonder were exactly on the river that would be and how long before he was found

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