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25th Missouri at Shiloh

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An Illustrated History of the Missouri Engineers and the 25th Infantry Regiment. You have to go to page 120 to read about Col. Peabody & to page 124 to read about the 25th Missouri Infantry at the Battle of Shiloh.

http://books.google.com/books?id=H5cvAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=An+Illustrated+History+of+the+Missouri+Engineers&cd=1#v=onepage&q=&f=false

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Yes, Dr. Neal's account is a good read, and it's also the source of historian Wiley Sword's belief that David Moore's report about his April 5th patrol may have been faked.

Neal's account is also one reason why I've started to believe there may have been two patrols sent out from Prentiss division on April 5th instead of just one. But that's for another day. :)

Perry

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Always had a random question regarding the 25th, but in particular Major Powell, and perhaps somebody can possibly shed some light on this subject matter. As we all know, Major Powell was killed on the 1st day of the Battle on April 6th, but as I was randomly searching for a grave site for Powell, I learned that he is in fact buried at Shiloh National Cemetery, under one of the many "Unknown" headstones.

 

If this is the case, I was just curious if the Park or anyone of note, does indeed have more information or possible evidence as to which grave it is? I know it is a far fetched hope, but in a way it sort of breaks my heart to learn that a pretty known name from Shiloh who died during the battle, is known where he is buried at (for the most part), but not given a proper headstone, etc.

 

Again, forgive me, but my mind was just wondering & wandering for a little bit. Thanks.

 

-Paul

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Paul

 

During my research into the Sunken Road/Hornet's Nest, I was surprised to discover Major James Edwin Powell of the 25th Missouri had successfully withdrawn to that location, only to die early afternoon. (I had assumed he died near where Colonel Peabody was struck down, early in the morning.)

 

I suspect that after his death, Major Powell's body was moved a short distance behind the lines (perhaps only a dozen yards) and laid out with other Federal KIA's, awaiting outcome of the battle. After the Hornet's Nest was overrun/surrendered, Major Powell's body would have remained in place until after the action of April 7th, when burial parties went to work. Because special care was given to Federal dead, I am sure that Major Powell would have been identified, and buried in a marked grave. [Just an item of interest: the Major's son, eleven-year-old Jimmy Powell, was present at Shiloh, and might have been able to make the identification (if no one else was able).  Shortly after the Battle of Shiloh, Jimmy Powell made his own way home to The Forks, Maine.]

 

I suspect that years later, when burial teams re-interred bodies from the battle in the National Cemetery, Powell's was one of those whose marker had vanished; and he may not have possessed suitable identification (although I believe he was recorded as 'unknown officer,' based on where the Powell family now believes he was buried: Plot #3582 in Officers' Circle.)

 

For more information, see the attached links.

 

Regards

 

Ozzy

 

 

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=18483519     (Find-a-grave  #18483519  for Major James Powell)

 

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=18793387     (Find-a-grave  #18793387  for Jimmy Powell)

 

 

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I absolutely love the fact that I'm constantly learning new things about Shiloh from someone who lives down under! Keep up the good work Oz!

 

Jim

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Another tid-bit...

 

Charles Morton was born in Ohio in 1846, and appointed to West Point from the State of Missouri in 1865, at the age of nineteen. After graduation in 1869, he served as cavalry officer on the Western frontier; did garrison duty on the Pacific Coast; during the Spanish-American War, he went to Cuba in 1898, and to the Philippines in 1899. He retired in 1910 with the rank of Brigadier General.

 

But, before Charles Morton was a Cadet at USMA, he was a Private in the 25th Missouri... and saw action at the Battle of Shiloh... and witnessed some of the early events of April 6th, 1862. The following link to a 1907 New York MOLLUS entry, entitled A Boy at Shiloh, records Morton's recollections, backed up by brothers William, Marcus and John (who were also in the 25th Missouri.) Pride of place is given to Peabody, Powell and Donnelly; brickbats to Grant and Sherman and Prentiss. Story begins page 52, and runs to page 70... and along the way, Charles Morton describes what happened to Major Powell.

 

 

Cheers

 

Ozzy

 

 

 http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?num=52&u=1&seq=96&view=image&size=100&id=wu.89065903692&q1=Loyal+Legion     (A Boy at Shiloh from HathiTrust)

 

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Belle, Mona and Paul

 

While continuing to research 'what became of Major Powell,'  the report of [then Private] Charles Morton indicated he was 'transported away from the Hornet's Nest in an ambulance.' Before commencing this line of investigation, the only ambulance at Shiloh I was aware of, was the one General Beauregard got criticized for bringing up from Corinth, and using as his personal Winnebago.

 

However, other reports make reference to ambulance use by Federal soldiers at Shiloh; upon further investigation, it appears 'the Modern Ambulance Service' was in its infancy in early 1862. But by the Battle of Antietam in September, the system of stretcher bearers and ambulances had been nearly perfected.

 

The man responsible was General William A. Hammond, who assumed the role of Surgeon General of the Army in January 1862: he is considered the 'Father of the Modern Ambulance Service.' (The attached link includes a period photograph of a horse-drawn ambulance; and describes development of the Ambulance Service during the Civil War.)

 

Cheers

 

Ozzy

 

 

http://www.emt-resources.com/History-of-Ambulances.html     (One-page History of the Ambulance Service, by emt resources)

 

http://pabook.libraries.psu.edu/palitmap/bios/Letterman__Jonathan.html     (Jonathan Letterman also worked to perfect ambulance system)

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