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  1. Now appearing on the Western Theater in the Civil War website/blog: https://www.westerntheatercivilwar.com/post/the-unlucky-13th-at-shiloh
    2 points
  2. https://doncarlosnewton.wordpress.com/2020/05/03/we-leave-tomorrow-for-tennessee/amp/ This is a very well done collection of Don Carlos Newton's correspondence. Recently another Newton letter appeared on ebay. https://www.ebay.com/itm/CIVIL-WAR-LETTER-52nd-Illinois-Infantry-Slave-Cook-Whiskey-GREAT-CONTENT/224213491121?_trksid=p2485497.m4902.l9144 Don Carlos Newton to Mary after Shiloh Stark Herrington Legore Prindle.pdf
    2 points
  3. After my first post about the 13th Ohio Battery, I came across a few more sources and hence have done a follow up post: More on the Unlucky 13th at Shiloh!
    1 point
  4. Seemingly a study on any unit being reported as having cowardly conduct could be an interesting topic. The 71st Ohio's story of flight has been fairly well proven to be an exaggeration, and seemingly there is some evidence that the 13th Ohio Battery suffered from an unfair account from Hurlbut as other reports I mention in the two blog posts allude to. I do not know enough of Hurlbut to surmise if he warrants a pass or fail grade.
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  5. I'm sorry. I've been away from the group for a while and just now saw your question. If you look at this map on my ShilohDiary website (https://shilohdiary.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/easternrockhillmap.pdf), the cave would have been directly behind (north of) the location noted as "The Duncans' House." I have not explored the location thoroughly enough to determine if the cave still exists, but C.D. Rickman told me that he remembered seeing it while playing on that property as a child in the 1950s. It was C.D.'s childhood memories of the hill, cave and creek that led us to look at this proper
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  6. Once you wrote the Yates part about Prentiss, it all came back to me. He played a pretty important role in 1861 in Illinois, so it is understandable he was annoyed about having Grant over him. For McClellan, the Blair family is likely the best overall answer. I almost put Lincoln for McClernand. It is true, but with two cavaets. First they were not friends and came from opposing parties. McClernand campaigned against Lincoln in 1860 and 1864. They even faced off in court a few times. But they had a decent working relationship, and did work a court case together. It is notable that af
    1 point
  7. Well done Sean Chick! If I can expand on your correct answers: Benjamin Prentiss “had benefit of a politician; not a very good one.” At start of the National Emergency, Illinois Governor Richard Yates appears to have supported Prentiss (sent him to Cairo to command the situation there.) After the death of Senator Stephen Douglas in June 1861, Orville H. Browning was parachuted into the empty Senate seat… and assumed “support” of fellow Quincy resident, Benjamin Prentiss. McClernand was the “Leading Congressman from Illinois” and provided his own patronage; and managed to finagle patr
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  8. Thanks for posting these Newton letters. The experience of the 52nd Illinois on April 6 needs to be better understood. I think their retreat late in the afternoon is a key reason the Union lines collapsed when it did. The lack of discussion of the regiment in the battle's after action reports (at least among those published) is curious.
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  9. Benjamin Prentiss: Good one. He was a politician but not a major one. John McClernand: John McClernand Henry Wager Halleck: He seems to have owed his position to the support of Winfield Scott. Halleck, while a master of army politics, was not quite so good at getting patrons among the politicians. George B. McClellan: Montgomery Blair Lew Wallace: I think Oliver Morton, although from a different party, took a shine to Wallace. Stephen Hurlbut: Abraham Lincoln, who thought Hurlbut was one of the finest public speakers in the country. John A. Logan: John A. Logan
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  10. I have always seen what happened to them as a perfect storm. They were poorly placed by Hurlbut, poorly trained, and poorly led. One thing I recently ran into was the Captain Felix Robertson's thoughts on the matter. He felt their withdrawal was due to both his accurate cannon fire and a lack of infantry support. Robertson did not think that Hurlbut's first position on the south end of Sarah Bell Field was ever occupied, but rather Hurlbut said the division was positioned there after the battle to cover what happened to the 13th Ohio Battery. It would be a scandal sending a green battery far a
    1 point
  11. https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/jillistathistsoc.107.3-4.0296 Both Newton and Wilcox were at the protracted 1863 Court Martial of Col. Silas Baldwin of the 57th Illinois. Newton was a witness for the prosecution and Col John S Wilcox was a member of the Court, which convicted Baldwin. A Newton letter confirms that Wilcox went to Chicago on orders from Halleck just prior to the battle at Pittsburg Landing. Newton sent a letter home with Wilcox, apparently. Wilcox had testified at the proceeding involving fraud over a rations contract that involved the 52nd's Col Wilson and his QM
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  12. Had to read through the attachment to “The Western Theatre in the Civil War (The Unlucky 13th at Shiloh)” a couple of times to glean the full story. But, if true, it is damning: Captain Myers reported with his battery to Savannah “about the 20th of March” and was told by the Commanding General [on 20 March 1862 this would be Major General Grant] to “take your company on shore at Pittsburg Landing, and go up on the bank and search out ground for [your] camp wherever [you] please, and wait for further orders.” These orders did not come until early April, when it appears Burrow’s 14th Ohio Batter
    1 point
  13. Below is the text of a long letter by Oliver Boardman of the 6th Iowa Infantry. There are some rather colorful descriptions of the battle. Boardman had high praise for Sherman's bravery. Owl Creek Pittsburg Tennessee Apr 24th.. 1862 Henry and Jane I shall write to both at once as it is too expensive under the circumstances to write two letters when one would answer the purpose if it is only large enough I had laid in apretty good supply of paper postage stamps tobacker &c before the battle but they were all destroyed then beside numerous other articles the consequence is I
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  14. Glad you liked it. I think the Chicago Historical Society has some unpublished reports in Smith Bankhead's papers and I recently found the 6th Kentucky (CSA) report at the Filson Club in Edwin Porter Thompson's papers. If I get it transcribed I will upload it here.
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  15. I stumbled upon this unsubmitted report by L.D. Sandidge, who served on Daniel Ruggles' staff. Particularly valuable for his discussion of the attack on William Tecumseh Sherman's camp on the morning of April 6. Link will be at the bottom. On the evening prior to the battle, I encamped Ruggles' division of three brigades and four batteries of artillery and a battalion of cavalry extending Bragg's line to the left, and instead of placing the left brigade en potence with the alignment, I found that Hardee's line did not rest on Owl creek. I extended the left brigade on continu
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  16. Great find on L. D. Sandidge (there are any number of undiscovered gems yet to be revealed in the Southern Historical Society Papers.) What makes Sandidge's report compelling: he was one of a very few men who rode from the extreme left to the extreme right during the Battle of Shiloh; acquiring a better feel for the events of 6 and 7 April 1862 than Beauregard, or even Albert Sidney Johnston. On the Federal side, only Grant and one or two of his staff officers accomplished a similar feat. There's nothing like “being there” to gain an appreciation for the lay of the land.
    1 point
  17. I am currently piecing April 7 together and it is quite a difficult battle to figure out, particularly on the Confederate side with the units being jumbled together and accounts differing so much.
    1 point
  18. For those who doubted it, in my research I have found proof of the Watson Battery at Shiloh, from Clarke's Diary of the War of Separation, which includes Alexander Walker's Shiloh report for the New Orleans Delta. He has the Watson Battery in the bombardment of Pittsburg Landing late on April 6. "The artillery were all hurried forward to complete the work. Thirty-six of our best guns were now brought into position on a ridge at a distance of three-fourths of a mile from the enemy's main body. There was the Watson heavy battery, of Breckinridge's Division, among the first to take it
    1 point
  19. For The Maps of Shiloh I am creating a “tactical” order of battle for April 7, as the Confederates and Grant's army had lots of units mixed here and there, and it helps to understand the fighting. In doing so, I have found a few units where it is hard to establish where they were. All but one is Confederate. 46th Ohio I have found nothing in Daniel, Smith, or Lanny K. Smith. You can bet if this regiment had so much as marched 100 yards, Thomas Worthington would have mentioned it along with a dig at Sherman. But there is nothing I have seen. 17th Alab
    1 point
  20. Maybe Grant sustained Mason to help out a fellow from Ohio? Just a thought as he might have smarted at the accusations against the state. At any rate, it is very much human nature to blame a whole group, even if the 1st, 4th, and 20th Tennessee did not conform to the stereotype about Tennessee troops at Shiloh.
    1 point
  21. Fifty years after the end of the Civil War, an astute author realized that the men who had made History, and their stories were in imminent danger of being lost forever. So, Mamie Yeary set out across Texas (and had manuscripts sent her) to record as many “average Johnnies” as possible. Their stories, brief and poignant, leave the reader “wishing for more” …which may be possible, because many kept diaries; and almost all wrote letters during the war. And, with a name (and combat unit designation) we now have a starting point… especially for the scores of Confederate Shiloh veterans who made th
    1 point
  22. Thanks, I read over Haydon's article, and offered some important tactical and staff details. Thanks for pointing me to it.
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  23. As for shirkers at Shiloh, the two States besmirched: Tennessee and Ohio. Tennessee was pointedly mentioned in a Letter from Mrs. Bragg to General Bragg (and in a subsequent letter, he agreed with her observation.) Tennessee also suffered from “that regiment” that even Breckinridge and Isham Harris could not control... leading to General Johnston trying his hand... leading to the General's death. On the Federal side, Ohio was the one that had to overcome the bad reputation: EVERYONE knew about the 53rd Ohio and their Colonel, who told them to, “Run and save yourselves.” And in front
    1 point
  24. Joseph Rich was obviously biased against Lew Wallace: a man whose Division had been promised to the 12th Iowa all day, yet failed to deliver. [Although not delivered to POW Camp, Joseph Rich was captured with many other wounded men -- perhaps as many as 300 -- yet left behind, mostly in the Camp of the 3rd Iowa, because it was too much trouble to remove wounded prisoners that could not walk from the battlefield. Two other captured wounded known to have been left behind: David W. Reed (Father of Shiloh NMP) and BGen WHL Wallace.] Lew Wallace's Division had been promised to most of the othe
    1 point
  25. Major Dudley Haydon reached Richmond end of April/ early May 1862. He carried with him 1) a Letter from Brigadier General William Preston to Johnston's son dated 18 APR 1862, 2) his Diary (from at least January, perhaps back to OCT 1861 when he joined General Johnston's Staff at Bowling Green) 3) eye-witness accounts of General Johnston's death from the other members of Staff, 4) knowledge of Staff meetings and Councils of War in the days leading up to Shiloh, 5) knowledge of General Johnston that he could share with Wm. P. Johnston (who had not seen his Father since SEP 1861). Either with the
    1 point
  26. I read it today and thought "everything that is old is new." Outside of his harsh treatment of Lew Wallace, this very much reads like Tim Smith's argument. That adds to my contention that a lot of current scholarship, far from being unbiased, is a more detailed version of the Just Cause narrative of the Civil War. Before anyone chops off my head, Smith's work on Shiloh is first rate and I refer back to it all the time in my work. I also like Sword, Cunningham, and Daniel, and all three of them for different reasons. Hell, even Groom works as an introduction to the battle. Shiloh has been
    1 point
  27. Interesting... Do we know what Haydon delivered? In my Beauregard research I think Preston Johnston, at least in 1862, did not totally have it in for Beauregard. His report to Davis could have been harsher.
    1 point
  28. For another take on Johnston's death, this comes from his courier: Broome, John P. “How Gen. A.S. Johnson Died.” Confederate Veteran, vol. 16 (December 1908), p. 629. I am not certain I believe it, but its better than William Stevenson's account, which does not line up and seems like an attempt to be there for a big moment. I posted it here as I consider couriers to be part of the staff, even if not formally so. I had an ancestor who was a courier for Loring, even though he was illiterate.
    1 point
  29. Joyce, Fred. “Two Dogs.” The Southern Bivouac, October, 1883, 72-74. - Places Cobb with Trabue on April 7, likely at Crescent Field in the morning.
    1 point
  30. Here are a few gems I found. “Colonel Hicks–Captain Bagwell.” The Southern Bivouac, January 1884, 270-271. - A rare Union centered article. Hicks comes across as an action hero. Duke, Basil. “The Battle of Shiloh.” The Southern Bivouac, December 1883, 150-162. - This is part 1 of Duke's retelling. He has Johnston predicting a battle not at Pittsburg Landing but Shiloh Church itself during Johnston's brief stay at Mufreesboro. Of course Johnston said this to Bowen and both men were conveniently dead. Harcourt, A.P. “Terry’s Texas Rangers.” The Southern Bivou
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  31. Southern Bivouac Monthly (1882 – 1887) Much like the Union Veteran's National Tribune, the Southern Bivouac provided a forum for Southern Veterans wanting to air views on battles and leaders. Published by the Southern Historical Association of Louisville, Kentucky from 1882 until 1887 the monthly magazine benefited from the quality of its editors: Wm. N. McDonald, R. W. Knott and Basil Duke. All six volumes are available at HathiTrust at the below link: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/002909878 Southern Bivouac Monthly Magazine And for SDG readers, these are some of
    1 point
  32. Thanks for the above information, especially about Baylor: been collecting as many details of Albert Sidney Johnston's Staff as possible http://shilohdiscussiongroup.com/topic/1901-albert-sidney-johnstons-staff/?tab=comments#comment-14303 primarily because of the Beauregard vs. Jefferson Davis feud, and the role of General Johnston's staff in white-anting General Beauregard, helping facilitate his removal from command in June 1862. [One particularly fascinating character is Dudley Haydon (sometimes spelled Hayden) of Kentucky. He hand-delivered material to President Davis at Richmond afte
    1 point
  33. The old link appears to be disabled; this is the new link: http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/spec-coll/msc/ToMsC950/MsC906/CivilWarCollection.html [Scroll down 1/4 page.] “Sunday, April 6th. It has been a pleasant day so far as weather is concerned but extremely unpleasant on account of the shell, shot, and bullets flying so profusely. The rebels attacked our advance about six o’clock A.M. Our regiment was not called out until about ½ past 7 oclock. We formed in line of battle soon after leaving our camp and met the enemy (who had driven our advance divisions back) about ¾ of a mile f
    1 point
  34. The primary source for prisoner identification of John Hunt Morgan at Corinth on 7 April 1862 is 1st Lieutenant Joseph B. Dorr, QM for the 12th Iowa Infantry who was captured with most of the rest of his regiment at Hell's Hollow about 5:30 p.m. on April 6th. Dorr had been a newspaperman with Dubuque Herald before the war, and indicates in his diary: "I saw and conversed with the celebrated Captain John Morgan [on Monday afternoon]. He was pointed out to me by a young man in the crowd... He talked with several prisoners, but my informant said he did not wish to have us know him." [Found on pag
    1 point
  35. Which two states would those be? I know Tennessee is often accused, but for the rest it seems very much like a regiment to regiment deal, even for Tennessee.
    1 point
  36. Do you have the sources handy? It would explain why Duke is so quiet about April 7.
    1 point
  37. Looking through it today I found two nuggets in volume 1. On page 45 you get a short account by Baylor. It is blunt, including a defense of slavery. He mentions getting shot in the nose while on Johnston's staff. The best though is by a member of Morgan's squadron on page 259-261. It is very detailed. It places Morgan at Sarah Bell Field before shifting over to the right. Apparently Morgan acted as escort for Breckinridge before 2:00 p.m.
    1 point
  38. That makes sense, as the 46th Ohio pretty much disintegrated after the afternoon fight in Crescent Field. I do have an update... In volume of Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, page 764, a veteran of the 17th Alabama mentions guarding prisoners on April 7. Jackson in his report (555) says the regiment fell back to its starting line, but he saw it later. Seems the regiment was a cross purposes on April 7, hence its absence most of the day.
    1 point
  39. As for Colonel Worthington's 46th Ohio: that officer had a “personality clash” with fellow Ohian William T. Sherman. And Worthington ultimately was subjected to Court Martial AUG 1862. I would not be surprised that Worthington submitted a report... that was never submitted by General Sherman (or which was presented at the Court Martial, and suppressed, by being included in the Court Martial file.) Also, Sherman wrote his official Shiloh report extremely quickly; finished it before Halleck arrived 11 April 1862, despite being actively engaged in the field thru 8 April. But, as regards the 46th
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  40. Thanks I hope it exceeds expectations. Shiloh is a bear of a battle to depict in accurate maps, but I have found some good stuff getting this ready.
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  41. I look forward to the publication of your book. I have several others in the series and have been lamenting the lack of a volume on the Battle of Shiloh.
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  42. In March/ April 1864 a massive inspection of Confederate Artillery was conducted by BGen W. N. Pendleton, Chief of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia as ordered by General Samuel Cooper. The results of that inspection, listing names of batteries, names of commanders (and other significant officers), battles engaged, losses incurred, current requirements, date and location of initial muster are to be found in OR ser.1 vol.32 (part 3) pages 684 - 709. The best collection of information, confirming the presence at Shiloh of particular artillery is included in Notes of the report attribute
    1 point
  43. Below I have shared the Diary of Samuel K. Cox, a young lieutenant in the 17th Kentucky Infantry, while the regiment was at Pittsburg Landing. Cox and the 17th fought at Fort Donelson, and so, were some of the veteran troops Grant had at Shiloh. He offers key details that are corroborated by other accounts, which helps understand the complex movements of Lauman's brigade on April 6th and 7th, 1862. The combined 17th/25th Kentucky Infantry regiments are the only Kentucky regiments that fought both days for the Union, as the rest were marching with Buell's army. The 17th was from my town, so I h
    1 point
  44. Wheelbarrow... an interesting read. And it puts me in mind of something that emerges from the study of the Battle of Shiloh: so many of the "survivors" of that Battle appear to have been "altered" (but not in the way one would expect). The experience sharpened the drive of many to "do better, and be better." In many cases, the quest for excellence became extraordinary: Ambrose Bierce. Would he have become the outstanding writer, whose works still find popularity today, without his exposure to "the Elephant?" John Wesley Powell. An artillery officer who lost an arm at Shiloh; and
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  45. Here it is, SJ. At the end of this post, you'll find a ink to a PDF document that includes about half of the diary. It's the half you need, though. It starts with some family ancestry background information and continues until the war is almost over. It's about 18,000 words total. First, let me add a few notes: This diary is a transcription of an old handwritten document. It contains a lot of transcription errors. I was able to fix most of them, but there are some names that I'm not sure how to fix, so I left them unchanged. For example, the full name of the person identified at "Middie" is Mi
    1 point
  46. Concerning Lew Wallace. Don't be too harsh in your criticism of his conduct on the 6th. He had been ordered to come up on the right of the army but had not been told that Sherman had fallen back. His choice to take the Shunpike was quite logical. Wallace's division had been exposed while at Adamsville/Stoney Lonesome/Crump's Landing. Lew Wallace and W.H.L. Wallace had come up with a contingency plan if Lew Wallace was attacked. The Hamburg-Savannagh Road was nearly impassable from the rising floodwaters of the Tennessee and an alternate route had been selected that would lead across Owl Creek
    1 point
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