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Joseph Rose

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Joseph Rose last won the day on May 17 2020

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About Joseph Rose

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    American Civil War, Ulysses S. Grant, cartography, historiography

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  1. Shortly after General Ulysses S. Grant captured Fort Donelson in mid-February 1862, his superior, Henry Halleck, ordered Grant’s main force on an expedition up the Tennessee River under a subordinate, General Charles Smith. Grant was to remain downriver at Fort Henry. He was certainly not, however, “virtually in arrest and without a command,” as claimed in his Personal Memoirs. Such noted biographers as Ron Chernow, Dr. Brooks Simpson, and Bruce Catton have repeated the story of Colonel John Thayer, who supposedly called to see General Grant at this point. A tearful Grant “said mournfully
  2. Ozzy, I think that McClernand gets a bum rap, and the charge of disloyalty, at least during this period seems seriously misplaced. Apart from offering detailed suggestions for the move on Fort Donelson (whether desire or not), what evidence exists that he was disloyal? On the 10th, McClernand wrote to Washburne: "Having entire confidence in Gen Grants representation I take great pleasure in concurring in his recommendation." The Papers of US Grant relate that, after the trip to Nashville: "a letter to USG was prepared at hd. qrs., 1st Div., Pine Landing, Tenn. 'We have heard wit
  3. Thanks, Ozzy. I think that it's surprising that nothing seems to have appeared in the newspapers about any possible bout of drinking.
  4. Ozzy et al., Although there was talk of Grant abusing alcohol on the trip to Nashville, I haven't seen any specific evidence for it. Have you? Boynton in the NY Sun of 1/23/87 wrote that, "There are living witnesses of the excesses of that river trip to Nashville, but Gen. Grant was brought out of it, first by Gen. Rawlins's discretion, and next and mainly, by the forebearance of Gen. Halleck, who deemed it best to withhold from the people the knowledge of this affair, and give the officer who had won such a notable victory another trial. . . . There is no more glaring instance of in
  5. I located Sgt. William H. Busbey's post-war article about his being near Grant's Savannah headquarters and on Tigress during the trip to Pittsburg Landing on April 6th in the Chicago Inter-Ocean. Some obvious errors make it not completely reliable, and it may be completely unreliable, but it does make for interesting reading: "I was at Savannah in April, 1862, associated with the work of the Adams Express company . Myself and another young man employed in the same office were sleeping on the night of April 5 in a house in Savannah three or four blocks from the river. General Grant's headq
  6. That is a very strange article. The writer has Buell's army seemingly appearing on the wrong side of the Tennessee (or has Savannah on the wrong side of the river). The Evansville Daily Journal of 4/8/62 has officers from up the TN River on Apr 5 expecting battle, but apparently there were no boats that day from Grant's army. William C. Carroll (US Grant's pet reporter) wrote for the Louisville Journal, which was the evident source for this article. He had been with Grant earlier in March (when Grant received a sword from his subordinates), and was just returning upriver to Savannah
  7. Grant penned his stiffly worded letter to Buell and signed it, “Major-General, commanding” from the “Headquarters District of West Tennessee, Nashville,” as if that city were in his jurisdiction and not in his respondent’s departmental command. Oddly, Grant reverted to “Brigadier-General” when signing subsequent orders.
  8. The boat carrying the 57th Ohio soldier in Stuber's account may well have been John Raine. The U.S. Civil War diary of Charles Kroff, 1861-1865 reads: "But it being Sunday and so early in the morning, we were confident that it was a battle. But we soon learned positively, from a boat that came down the river, that a battle was raging furiously." Kroff was at Crump's. It doesn't sound like Tigress going downriver with Baxter as that was not "soon" after "early in the morning." And Grant was going "upriver" mid-morning on Tigress beside he didn't know battle raging. According to William Rowley,
  9. I think that Lauman got a raw deal regarding Second Jackson. He had been ordered the day before IIRC to keep abreast of the division on his left. He, and many of his supporters, claim that he was following orders when the unfortunate incident occurred. Ord, Sherman, and Grant had him immediately releieved and given no chance to obtain justice through a court of inquiry. Their hurry to get Lauman out and keep this quiet indicates that Lauman was more of a scapegoat than a guilty party.
  10. I don't have time to do this justice right now, but I think that you are quite correct in indicating that Grant's effort to keep McClernand "down" hurt the establishment of a proper chain of command both before and during the early part of the battle. Grant had been calling Smith "Major-General" for a long time before April, but he didn't recognize McClernand as even ranking Brigadier-General Sherman, whom Grant had selected to be the de facto commander of the camps around Pittsburg Landing. And many histories make McClernand the bad guy for disputing the ranking that Grant gave Smit
  11. It's strange that, after Grant's first three battles, he didn't submit one comprehensive official report. After Belmont, Grant provided minimal information about the battle, and even his falsified second report years later failed to expand on what happened (although he did slag Buford inappropriately because he had changed his opinion of that officer). After Donelson, his report was ridiculously short; the battle of the 15th takes a paragraph and a half; and it was written before other sub-reports reached him. After Shiloh, he excused his failure to submit an official report bec
  12. There is so much to take in, review, and respond. The whole cavalry episode is contradictory. Rawlins, in his attempt to scapegoat Wallace, wrote about the cavalry officer: "This officer returned between 12 o'clock m. and 1 o'clock p. m., and reported that when he delivered your message to Major-General Wallace he inquired if he had not written orders. He replied in the negative, and General Wallace said he would only obey written orders." There seems to be no corroboration for this version, besides Rowley's similar attack on Wallace, which included: ""Shortly after the hour of 12 o'clock
  13. Before I make any reply to Ozzy's comprehensive post, I just wanted to paste in the ‎Snippet view from a Google search result from Civil War Memories - Page 193 by Linda Zimmermann - 1998. It looks new to me, concerning the Tigress and its passengers on the trip upstream, April 6th. The book's Amazon description states: "An exciting compilation of firsthand accounts of the Civil War from a soldier who was also a journalist." The subtitle is, "The Collected writings of Sgt. William H. Busbey." That individual seems to have been a soldier-correspondent in the 1st Kentucky of Bruce's AotO brigad
  14. As to "The bill introduced by Senator Thurman for the relief of Col. Tom Worthington," the Columbia (TN) Herald & Mail 1878-05-03 indicated that Worthington delivered lectures as Sherman declined an inquiry. Two years later, the Chicago Tribune 1880-05-15 indicated that Worthington would get a cash payment ($962) to cover some of the period after his dismissal, but that he would get no court of inquiry from Congress. It would have been interesting if testimony had been given.
  15. I would change Grant's arrival at Pittsburg Landing to 9:30 am (+/- 10 minutes) in accordance with the logbook of USS Tyler. I suggest that Grant sent Rawlins with orders to bring up Lew Wallace after the 10 am meeting with Sherman, as this would make Baxter's 11:30 arrival at Stoney Lonesome more understandable and both Bieler and Hurlbut indicate that they received information that Lew Wallace would be approaching by the Owl Creek bridge. I am quite sure that Grant's orders were for Wallace to join the right of the army (and not Pittsburg Landing or around the 2nd Division camps). It wo
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