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Found 21 results

  1. Sixteen hundred Federal prisoners commenced their slow march to Corinth on Monday morning, April 7th and soon began to realize things had not gone well militarily for their Southern captors. Many witnessed the body of General Albert Sidney Johnston (under escort of six officers) passing, enroute for the train to New Orleans via Memphis [Genoways p.56]. As the POWs trudged towards Corinth, there was no ignoring the makeshift hospitals -- one after another after another -- on both sides of the road, tending the Rebel wounded [Genoways p.96]. But the singular event that gave the captured men hope
  2. As anyone who has made the attempt knows, it is difficult to find a comprehensive story of Edward O. C. Ord's involvement, and contribution, to the Civil War. And details concerning Brigadier General Ord's first engagement, at Dranesville, Virginia, in December 1861, are especially difficult to unearth. The story of Dranesville is important to us at SDG because, although EOC Ord was not present at Battle of Shiloh, the loss of so many Union Generals (WHL Wallace, died from wound; B. M. Prentiss, captured; John P. Cook, forced to take sick leave; C.F. Smith, succumbed to infection of leg, injur
  3. Ozzy

    Otto H. Matz

    First time I visited Rio de Janeiro many years ago, I arrived by ship. The night before, from a distance of one hundred miles, a star appeared on the southern horizon that seemed to mark the location of Brasil's most reknowned city; and the ship adjusted course and aimed for the star. Curiously, that star did not rise, but remained in place, hovering just above the horizon... but did disappear with the rising of the sun. Of course, what I had seen was not a star, but the brightly illuminated Christ Redeemer Statue that is the symbol of Rio. Next day I went with friends to the top of Mount Corc
  4. The 19th Arkansas Infantry (Dockery's) was mustered into service in southern Arkansas (DeValls Bluff) on 2 April 1862 under command of Colonel Hamilton Smead and immediately ordered to Corinth, Mississippi... but began arriving at Memphis on April 7th ...too late to take part in the Battle of Shiloh. Instead of going on to Corinth, the 19th Arkansas was directed to Fort Pillow, a few miles above Memphis on the Mississippi River (and the Confederate fallback position after fall of Island No.10) and transport was provided aboard CSS Capitol: http://www.rfrajola.com/JPMCSN/JPMCSN.pdf Collec
  5. Following on the Confederate evacuation from Corinth end of May 1862, many in the Government at Richmond became quite unhappy with the performance of General PGT Beauregard. President Jefferson Davis, in particular, harbored a grudge that stemmed from Beauregard's publication of his Manassas report in newspapers (criticizing Davis' role in not promoting pursuit of the retreating Federals as they fled pell- mell towards Washington.) The grudge festered with the death of Davis' friend, Albert Sidney Johnston at Shiloh, and Beauregard's cavalier report of that man's death, tacked into a telegram
  6. [Sketch of Corinth Mississippi by Adolph Metzner, on file with Library of Congress.] The following Letter of 20 March 1862 from Braxton Bragg to wife Eliza is of interest due the following: Bragg reveals the lack of discipline discovered upon his arrival in Corinth; "draconian measures" put in place by Major General Bragg to instill discipline at Corinth; discusses feeble health of General Beauregard (who is still at Jackson Tennessee, attempting recuperation) reveals pre-planning stage, before General Johnston arrives (and before decision taken on "what is to com
  7. As we know, Van Dorn's Army (recently defeated at Pea Ridge, Arkansas) was "required" to come East, and join with the Army of the Mississippi at Corinth. Very little arrived in time for Shiloh; the following work describes the belated movement east, and participation in the Siege of Corinth, from the Rebel viewpoint: A Southern Record: History of the Third Regiment, Louisiana Infantry by (Major) William H. Tunnard and published at Baton Rouge (1866). Beginning page 161, details of the march via Little Rock, to steamers bound for Memphis, and riding the Memphis & Charleston, arriving at Co
  8. From the Union standpoint, the Battle of Shiloh was not supposed to happen. Federal troops were sent south, under command of Brigadier General C.F. Smith, with intention of cutting rail lines and disrupting Rebel communications (between Fort Columbus and Corinth; and between Florence and Corinth.) Abundant Spring rain and effective Rebel defences (and M & O R.R. repair crews) curtailed railroad track disruption. Although an initial base of operations was sited at Union-friendly Savannah, Tennessee, the intention was to establish the Federal base much further south (between Hamburg and
  9. From the Civil War Diaries Collection at Auburn University comes this Shiloh battle record, compiled by L. I. Nixon of Limestone County, Alabama. Incensed by hearing of the Confederate defeats at Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, 38-year old Liberty Independence Nixon left his wife and seven children and joined Malone's Company... and on February 24th 1862 was on his way to Corinth. After a brief stay, Malone's Company of the 1st Battalion of Alabama Volunteers returned south to vicinity of Mobile Bay to gather supplies; then a return to Corinth on the M & O R.R. took place on March 4th. Campi
  10. I begin this post with a fact unknown to most Shiloh aficianados: Charles Ferguson Smith, although referred to as "General" Smith, was technically still Colonel Smith through the Fort Henry Campaign. When General Grant learned shortly afterwards that Smith's appointment had been held up in the U.S. Senate, Grant complained to Elihu Washburne (on about 10 FEB 1862) that "Smith must be confirmed, immediately." During the investment of Fort Donelson, C.F. Smith was informed by Major General Halleck (on 14 FEB) that the Senate had finally confirmed him as Brigadier General, with effective date of
  11. Presented is an interesting telegram sent by Major George W. Brent (from the former Army of the Mississippi HQ at Jackson, Tennessee) to General Beauregard at Corinth on April 2nd 1862: http://civilwar.rosenbach.org/?p=5512 [from "Today in the Civil War: dispatches from the Rosenbach Collection"]. Ozzy
  12. The following questions are in reference to Braxton Bragg, controversial personality who acted in support of the Confederacy during the War of the Rebellion. In order to make these questions a bit easier to answer correctly, each question is posed as True-or-False. Good Luck! Leroy Pope Walker was the first Confederate Government Secretary of War (and the man who famously predicted that the Clash of Arms between North and South would be such a short affair that he offered to sop up all the spilled blood with a handkerchief.) Walker resigned in September 1861 and was appointed Bri
  13. The following letter written by Major General Braxton Bragg to his wife, Eliza, and sent from Corinth on 29 MAR 1862 reveals the mindset of Confederate leaders in the build-up to Battle of Shiloh. Discussed in the letter: the importance of the Mississippi River to the Confederacy; incompetence responsible for the loss of New Madrid; Bragg's recommended strategy for Arkansas (and use of Van Dorn) Confederate evaluation of Union force (under C.F. Smith) and Smith's likely objectives; Bragg compares his Army of Pensacola to the forces under A.S. Johnston and Leonida
  14. Whether by accident or design, Terre Haute Indiana not only found itself on the National Road (leading from Cumberland Maryland to St. Louis Missouri -- today's Route 40), but Terre Haute sits within a stone's throw of Illinois. That accidental location led to many Indiana citizens joining an infantry regiment associated with Crawford County, Illinois... or more particularly, a regiment associated -- by design -- with a brigade created by Illinois Congressman John McClernand, consisting of the 27th, 30th and 31st Illinois Infantry regiments. One of these "Indiana soldiers" serving Illinoi
  15. Born in Baden, German Federation in 1834, Adolph Metzner migrated to America in 1856 ...and raised a company of Turner Society members at Indianapolis (which became Company A of the 32nd Indiana Infantry) Colonel August Willich, commanding. Attached to Army of the Ohio after muster in August 1861, the 32nd Indiana occupied Bowing Green, Kentucky in February 1862 ...stopped briefly in Nashville ...and joined the march south and west to Pittsburg Landing to reinforce U.S. Grant. Reaching the west side of the Tennessee River morning of April 7th, Colonel Willich led his men into a gap between W.T
  16. Published in 1890 (and now available at hathitrust) this two-volume set of sketches contains images of Fort Donelson, Shiloh and Corinth you have probably never seen before: Pictorial History of The Soldier in our Civil War. In Volume one, the section on Fort Donelson begins page 235. Pittsburg Landing/Shiloh begins page 262 (with the image of "McClernand's Second Line on April 6th" of particular interest.) Also, a detailed diagram of Grant's Last Line, bottom of page 265. And on page 266, two-page sketch of Lew Wallace's advance April 7th. On page 268, an interesting sketch by Henri Lovie of
  17. The above map, taken from the 1911 Joseph W. Rich book, The Battle of Shiloh, is the best to be found showing the railroads in vicinity of Pittsburg-Corinth, and surrounding area in March 1862. We tend to focus on the Memphis & Charleston and Mobile & Ohio railroads, particularly their intersection at Corinth; and forget about all the other lines (the existence of which made 'the efforts to cut the strategic Southern railroads' all the more difficult.) The rail lines shown on Rich's Map are as follows: Memphis & Charleston RR on the map, runs east from Memphis throu
  18. Over at Missouri Digital Heritage, ran across an outstanding journal that records a Rebel soldier's activity from 1860-1863. John M. Weidermeyer was born in Charlottesville, Virginia in 1834, and moved with his family to Missouri when he was five years old, eventually settling in Osceola, less than 20 miles from the border with Kansas. Incensed by outrages of the 'jayhawkers,' (which is why the diary begins in 1860), Weidemeyer organized a troop of cavalry early in 1861 (4th Cavalry Regiment, Missouri State Guard), but it was disbanded a few months later without seeing significant service. Wei
  19. Just for the sake of comparison, here is the Map used by Confederate Generals at the Battle of Shiloh (found in The Life of Albert Sidney Johnston, by William Preston Johnston (1878) page 558: And here is the map constructed for Henry Halleck, during the April/May 1862 advance on Corinth (found at the Library of Congress, and attributed to Colonel George Thom, Topographical Engineer): Obviously, someone had a lot more time on his hands... Regards Ozzy
  20. Was poking around the internet, looking for diaries and letters, and ran across one that may be of interest to SDG members: The Diary of Lafayette Rogan, Second Lieutenant, 34th Mississippi, Co. B (Tippah Rebels). On investigation, the 34th MS (sometimes called the 37th Mississippi) began recruiting in February 1862; but was not fully organized until after the Battle of Shiloh. The regiment, under command of Colonel Samuel Benton, was assigned to defense of Corinth in April, and fought in the Battle of Farmington on May 9th (during Halleck's Crawl to Corinth.) After the evacuation, the 34th
  21. It is said that William Horsfall stowed away on a steamboat on the Ohio River, in order to join a Union regiment 'out west.' In December 1861, he was mustered into the 1st Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, Co G, as a musician. But, he soon traded his drum for a rifle; he became known as an outstanding marksman. As part of Buell's Army of the Ohio, he marched with Bull Nelson's Division towards Savannah, Tennessee, and crossed the river to Pittsburg Landing at 5:30 on the afternoon of April 6th. Sleeping on the line overnight, at 4am his 22nd Brigade (Colonel Bruce) was ordered into line, near the
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