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I have a couple of bullets in my collection that were orginally part of the collection of the Old Fort Museum.Where would this have been located in relation to the Park? And what time was it in operation? The first time I visited Shiloh,the only place I remember that had relics on display was Shaws.

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Welcome to the board, Solingen. I honestly don't know about an Old Fort Museum. Doesn't ring any bells, at least for me. There used to be a relic shop just outside the park's main entrance along Highway 22, over on the west side of the park, but I don't think it went by that name. Shaw's, as you probably know, has been closed for several years now. C.D. had mentioned a small museum that opened this past spring, on the south side of the park, but I don't recall the name.

Now that I think of it, there may have been some kind of museum/relic shop on the south side of the park many years ago. I dimly remember reading something about that. But it could be my memory playing tricks on me. Someone else might be able to help, but I'm afraid I'm drawing a blank.

Perry

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been trying to get on the board for a couple of months, had to create a new account.

The old fort war museum sat approx 50 feet west of the split of hwy 142 and 22 approx 150 ft. from Ed Shaw's rest. it sat on the north side of hwy 22. it was built in the 30's by a fellow named Hardin. his widow sold it to Fred Lee along with the relics they had, there were several uniforms and guns, swords, and cannonballs plus orther things that had been picked up on the battlefield by the people of Shiloh. the relics were sold over time and Fred mainly sold beverages and sandwichs in the 50's. Fred Lee was Don Todd's father-in-law, he now runs the book store on the park.

the building was simple construction, wood frame with a blockhouse projecting on the corners near the road, these were covered with slabs to give the appearance of an old fort. unfortunately it was built at the close of a peroid of interest in the civil war and by the time the interest returned in the late 60's it was a pool hall. and was destroyed by fire in the 70's.

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You've been bad-mouthing the administrator again, haven't you C.D. See, the board's software program knows these things, and is programmed to kick out anyone who says bad things about the admin. :lol:

I'll get you squared away! And thanks for the information about the Old Fort Museum. Like I had said, I dimly remembered something about something, but that was the best I could do. Appreciate the help. :)

Perry

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Perry has gotten me on the board again! I am going down to talk to Celess Lee about how and when Fred Lee accquired the old fort, and what happened to all the relics. I am pretty sure he sold them off a few at a time. will let you know what I find out.

I met John and Dr. Buttram when they were here a couple of times, never saw their collections but it should have been extensive. I know they bought several items from some of the residents, mostly from Jim Harrison.

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ot sure how long I'll be on grandpa, it took me three tries today to get on the board.

I am working on a presentation for the SCV meeting September 13, I am working up a compilation of different maps and how they add to the confusion about the battle. I am afraid too many people look at Atwell's maps and think this is the way the area looked during the battle when in fact these maps were made in the early 1900s. These maps contain families that were here during the battle and show some road changes that the Park made themselves in early days. No wonder we stay confused oh no wait that's the way I am all the time!

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I agree that Atwell's maps, and any others of that period, should be examined with the earlier maps at hand. By earlier, I mean those from before the battle or shortly afterward. I don't remember if Atwell's maps show the northern leg of the split in the Corinth / Pittsburg Landing road, but the northern leg had been abandoned by 1909, and may have been abandoned much earlier. Wish I could be at the SCV meeting, but it's just too long a drive.

If hurricane Isaac doesn't flood us out, I will be giving some northern cousins a tour of Shiloh this Sat. Jim: I will be sure to mention the efforts of the 16th Wisconsin.

Grandpa

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When I got my copy of the atlas that accompanies the Official Records,I was surprised at the lack of detail in the map of Shiloh and of the area between Shiloh and Corinth.Compared to some of the other maps in the atlas,there is a lack of coverage.Not sure why this happened.The Union army engineers completed an excellent map of Middle Tennessee in 1864 that was not included in the atlas,but is in the National Archives.Maybe this also happened for this area.

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afraid not the maps the army of ohio made stopped at the tennessee river, I have a set I got from the archives 40 years ago. the best maps of Shiloh were drawn by the army of the ohio, one of their maps I believe it is plate xii has some good information about local residents. It dosen't have all of them but it is the best one.

Richard the Atwell maps(at least the early ones ) show the split just where it should be but it shows an unimproved road. the maps have the split just at Bee Blanton's driveway, which is where the ground evidence points to.

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